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Copyright: Internet and Email Guidelines

Whether you are a faculty member or a student, it's good to know about the complex copyright laws in the United States to avoid plagiarism or using something illegally in the classroom.

Guidelines for materials from the Internet

Guidelines for Using Materials Found on the Internet

  • Look on the webpage to see if there is information on how to use the work. If guidelines exist - use them!
  • Always credit the source of your information
  • If you are using material from the Internet on your webpage ask permission or link to the site.
  • If you gather and receive permission to use the material keep a copy of your request for permission and their response.
  • Marymount authorized users may link to full text journal articles. 

Email and Discussion Lists

Guidelines for Using Email

  • The author of an email owns the content of the message (unless you are a state employee, then the state owns it). 
  • As a recipient, you cannot make copies or distribute the message without permission of the sender.
  • Always credit the source
  • If you are using material from the Internet on your webpage ask permission or link to the site.
  • If you gather and receive permission to use the material keep a copy of your request for permission and their response.
  • A message posted to a newsgroup or discussion list such as a classroom discussion is "published. fair use can be applied to use portions of a public board discussion. Fair use is negated if the discussion board has a request that the material not be distributed in the course.
  • Students and faculty should check with course documentation in a syllabus for a fair use statement.